Learn how to not "over-react"

Patience is a virtue and I find myself learning this more each and every day.  I would like to think that I have chilled a little over the years, but like most of us, I have my issues that occasionally set me off.  One of the key points of self-awareness I like to remember is knowing where my blind spots are and also knowing how to avoid these when certain situations occur.

I have had to chuckle recently as I watched officials in Pittsburg over-reach (in my opinion) when a zealous Nashville Predator fan tossed a catfish on the ice in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup finals on Monday May 29 in Pittsburgh.catfish.jpg  The tradition of tossing a catfish on the ice has significant roots and the Preds are not the only team that has such a tradition. (consider the Detroit Red Wings and their tradition)

Local law enforcement officials, in their zeal, have charged this individual with disorderly conduct, disrupting meetings and possessing an instrument of crime.  Most of us have gotten a bigger laugh in the reaction versus the action and the higher this gets pushed, the more laughter and chatter you will see.

All of us have similar issues that we need to guard against.  I think to myself in earlier parts of my career when I got feedback from others that I was not a good listener.  I remember well my habit of walking away from others when they tried to engage me in conversation and this unconscious action on my part resulted in many instances of unintended anger and frustration from those who were trying to communicate with me.

All of us have our hot button issues.  We Johari_Window.PNGneed to remember what we learned from the Johari Window and to identify where our blind spots are in dealing with others.

For our friends in Pittsburgh, I would encourage you to learn how to love and embrace the catfish tradition.  There is nothing harmful going on here and your lack of a sense of humor in this is only making others get the bigger laugh.

Recognize your blind spots and do your best to avoid or compensate for them appropriately.