The Power of Perseverance-Staying Engaged

Stay the course is a phrase that has often been used by leaders.  While researching the phrase I found that Ronald Reagan and both Bush presidents used this phrase to underscore their commitment to commitments or directions that their administrations had employed during their presidencies.

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Staying the course, also known as perseverance, is a trait that can be extremely beneficial as well as extremely frustrating to leaders in their work.  When someone has a vision or plan that they have embarked upon, the path can sometimes become frustrating, difficult and appear to lead to no good end, but those who have true vision and perseverance stay the course and often reap the benefits for their persistence in their actions.

I often see this in work we pursue or in forging relationships that would be mutually beneficial.  I tell people that I am interviewing for my next job every day because of the project nature of much of our work.  There are so many instances where I see a firm that I know would be a good fit for our work, but the initial contact or conversation seems to go nowhere.  In some cases I move on, but in the most meaningful instances I find a way to review, reflect and redirect our approach.  In many instances this will eventually lead to success, but in some it still does not get to the ultimate result we are seeking.

The key learning in perseverance is not that you always get to the ultimate goal you have set, far from it.  Perseverance is a trait, a competency that shows others your willingness to stay the course, even when things become challenging.  This is not developed in a classroom or from reading in a book.  Perseverance is developed through experience, trial and error, and some of the best lessons will come from failing.  Having the same failure multiple times is not good, but learning from each failure is invaluable.

How have you developed perseverance?

What are you doing now that exhibits perseverance?

Remember, others are watching.

Stay the course.